Nokia 8110

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Nokia 8110

Hi!

Anybody tried Nokia 8110 4G on Fido/Rogers networks?

It seems that thery list bands compatible with Fido network but they may not be strong everywhere.

 

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Re: Nokia 8110

Hello YuChem,

 

  Welcome to the community!

 

  Have you purchased this phone or are you interested in purchasing it? As far as I am aware, there are two variants of that phone. According to the website, these are their specifications:

 

SKU 1(Europe) 2G: 900, 1800 3G: WB-CDMA 1, 5, 8 4G: FDD-LTE 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20

SKU2 (APAC, MEA,SSA) 2G: 900, 1800 3G: WB-CDMA 1, 5, 8, 39 4G: FDD-LTE 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20 TDD-LTE 39, 40, 41(38)

 

  According to those specifications, neither variant would have any compatible 2G bands/frequencies. However, both variants would only have one compatible band for '3G' and LTE, respectively. You can verify the compatible bands/frequencies here.  While the devices should be able to connect to the '3G' and LTE networks, coverage would depend on corresponding bands/frequencies used at your surrounding cellular towers. You can get an idea of your area towers here. In addition, you should also note that the different bands/frequencies vary in their characteristics. The higher frequencies (ie 2600MHz or band 7) don't travel as far or penetrate as deep as lower frequencies (see graphic here)

 

  I understand you are wondering if others have had success using that device on the networks. However, since the device has limited band/frequency compatibility, other people's experience with the device could be very different from yours. Many factors affect cellular reception and the service quality really depends on your particular set of circumstances (ie distance from cellular towers, potential sources of interference, your daily routine, etc). Yes, it may be helpful to know if others have been able to use that phone on the networks, but that does not necessarily mean that you would encounter the same experience.

 

  Personally, I wouldn't purchase a phone or device with limited band/frequency compatibility -- anymore. With some of my older phones, I valued form-factor over functionality. I still do miss my flip-phones 😢 However, few of them were intended for the North American market and I was missing out on connectivity more often than I had expected. I have since switched to a fully compatible device and gone are the days of having to drive across the city just to download MMS 😂

 

  I'm not saying your experience with that phone would be the same as mine with my previous phones since your circumstances would be different from mine. However, it might be something to keep in mind when considering devices with fewer compatible bands/frequencies.

 

Hope this helps 😀

 

Cheers

 

 

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Re: Nokia 8110

Hello YuChem,

 

  Welcome to the community!

 

  Have you purchased this phone or are you interested in purchasing it? As far as I am aware, there are two variants of that phone. According to the website, these are their specifications:

 

SKU 1(Europe) 2G: 900, 1800 3G: WB-CDMA 1, 5, 8 4G: FDD-LTE 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20

SKU2 (APAC, MEA,SSA) 2G: 900, 1800 3G: WB-CDMA 1, 5, 8, 39 4G: FDD-LTE 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20 TDD-LTE 39, 40, 41(38)

 

  According to those specifications, neither variant would have any compatible 2G bands/frequencies. However, both variants would only have one compatible band for '3G' and LTE, respectively. You can verify the compatible bands/frequencies here.  While the devices should be able to connect to the '3G' and LTE networks, coverage would depend on corresponding bands/frequencies used at your surrounding cellular towers. You can get an idea of your area towers here. In addition, you should also note that the different bands/frequencies vary in their characteristics. The higher frequencies (ie 2600MHz or band 7) don't travel as far or penetrate as deep as lower frequencies (see graphic here)

 

  I understand you are wondering if others have had success using that device on the networks. However, since the device has limited band/frequency compatibility, other people's experience with the device could be very different from yours. Many factors affect cellular reception and the service quality really depends on your particular set of circumstances (ie distance from cellular towers, potential sources of interference, your daily routine, etc). Yes, it may be helpful to know if others have been able to use that phone on the networks, but that does not necessarily mean that you would encounter the same experience.

 

  Personally, I wouldn't purchase a phone or device with limited band/frequency compatibility -- anymore. With some of my older phones, I valued form-factor over functionality. I still do miss my flip-phones 😢 However, few of them were intended for the North American market and I was missing out on connectivity more often than I had expected. I have since switched to a fully compatible device and gone are the days of having to drive across the city just to download MMS 😂

 

  I'm not saying your experience with that phone would be the same as mine with my previous phones since your circumstances would be different from mine. However, it might be something to keep in mind when considering devices with fewer compatible bands/frequencies.

 

Hope this helps 😀

 

Cheers

 

 


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