Quick Charge 3.0 on Fido LG G5

Quick Charge 3.0 on Fido LG G5

Quick Charge 3.0 on Fido LG G5

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I'm Qualified Level 1

Quick Charge 3.0 on Fido LG G5

Does anyone know if Quick Charge 3.0 is enabled on the LG G5 from Fido? I purchased the LG G5 and I was not able to get anything over 9V / 1.8A from an aftermarket QC 3.0 charger and the stock LG (QC 2.0) charger.  Perhaps Quick Charge 3.0 was disabled by Fido for safety reasons? 

 

 

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Re: Quick Charge 3.0 on Fido LG G5

Solved by Senior MVP Senior MVP

@EFTC wrote:

Does anyone know if Quick Charge 3.0 is enabled on the LG G5 from Fido? I purchased the LG G5 and I was not able to get anything over 9V / 1.8A from an aftermarket QC 3.0 charger and the stock LG (QC 2.0) charger.  Perhaps Quick Charge 3.0 was disabled by Fido for safety reasons? 


Hello EFTC,

 

  I think you might have some misconceptions about Quick Charge 3.0. The advantage of QC 3.0 over QC 2.0 is efficiency not a quicker charge. Both standards have a maximum power of 18 watts.

Quick charge.jpg

Taken from here.

 

  It is also important to note that the quick charge only applies upto approximately 80% of the battery's full charge. The last 20% would be the slower trickle-like charging. 

 

  The QC 3.0's technology, INOV (Intelligent Negotiation for Optimum Voltage), is

 

 ...able to dynamically adjust the charging voltage over the battery charging cycle. As a battery charges up, it slowly draws less and less current, which is partly why it takes longer to charge the last 20 percent than the first. Qualcomm states that its new technology allows the phone to request just enough voltage to reach the desired charge current, thereby maximising efficiency.

 

  

  Judging by those numbers it appears that it might actually be working properly (16.2W = 9V x 1.8A).

 

Hope this helps Smiley

 

Cheers

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Senior MVP


@EFTC wrote:

Does anyone know if Quick Charge 3.0 is enabled on the LG G5 from Fido? I purchased the LG G5 and I was not able to get anything over 9V / 1.8A from an aftermarket QC 3.0 charger and the stock LG (QC 2.0) charger.  Perhaps Quick Charge 3.0 was disabled by Fido for safety reasons? 


Hello EFTC,

 

  I think you might have some misconceptions about Quick Charge 3.0. The advantage of QC 3.0 over QC 2.0 is efficiency not a quicker charge. Both standards have a maximum power of 18 watts.

Quick charge.jpg

Taken from here.

 

  It is also important to note that the quick charge only applies upto approximately 80% of the battery's full charge. The last 20% would be the slower trickle-like charging. 

 

  The QC 3.0's technology, INOV (Intelligent Negotiation for Optimum Voltage), is

 

 ...able to dynamically adjust the charging voltage over the battery charging cycle. As a battery charges up, it slowly draws less and less current, which is partly why it takes longer to charge the last 20 percent than the first. Qualcomm states that its new technology allows the phone to request just enough voltage to reach the desired charge current, thereby maximising efficiency.

 

  

  Judging by those numbers it appears that it might actually be working properly (16.2W = 9V x 1.8A).

 

Hope this helps Smiley

 

Cheers


I'm Qualified Level 1

Thanks so much for your clarification.

 

In other words, the phone will talk to the charger and use the most appropriate voltage and current to charge the phone, am I correct?


@EFTC wrote:

Thanks so much for your clarification.

 

In other words, the phone will talk to the charger and use the most appropriate voltage and current to charge the phone, am I correct?


Hello again,

 

  In the strictest sense, the actual charging circuitry or apparatus is built into the phone. The plug and cord -- QC or non-QC -- are just power sources. They convert the electricity from the wall socket (AC) (or car socket, DC) into electricity the phone can use (DC). In addition, they regulate the voltage to what is required by the phone to charge the battery. Typically, that would be 5V for your non-QC phones. 

 

  A quick-charge enabled phone will generally draw around 9V. In real life, the phone will draw a range of voltages and amperages depending on the battery's charge state. The advantage of the QC 3.0 power source is that it is capable of more precisely matching the phone's charging requirements. For example, if the phone determines that the battery requires 6V to charge, the QC 3.0 can provide 6V. On the other hand, a QC 2.0 will only be able to provide 5V (9V would be too much). The battery will still charge, however, it will just do so less efficiently.

 

  So it's the phone's internal charging circuitry which determines the most appropriate voltage and current required to charge the battery. The power sources try to best meet those demands.

 

Hope this helps Smiley

 

Cheers 


I'm Qualified Level 1

Thank you very much for helping me better understand what Quick Charge is all about. Much appreciated.