LTE not always working on an andriod phone

LTE not always working on an andriod phone

LTE not always working on an andriod phone

SOLVED
wzfoto
I'm a Participant Level 2

LTE not always working on an andriod phone

 I have this phone: Xiaomi Redmi

 

http://www.mi.com/en/redmipro/

 

I have the 3Gb Fido dataplan.  I followed the instruction below to set a LTE APN.

 

http://forums.fido.ca/t5/forums/forumtopicpage/board-id/Smartphones/thread-id/10585

 

I notice that 30% of the time I am not connected to the LTE network.  Usually when I walk into a building such as a mall, my connection switch to either H+ or 3G.  My friend also has a fido plan (voice + data) on a samsung phone.  Is my phone no good?  If so, is there a work around?

 

Accepted Solution

Re: LTE not always working on an andriod phone

Solved by Senior MVP Senior MVP

Hello Wzfoto,

 

  Welcome to the community!

 

  These are the network bands for the device from that web page:

 

GSM B2/B3/B8
WCDMA B1/B2/B5/B8
TD-SCDMA B34/B39
CDMA2000/1X BC0
FDD-LTE B1/B3/ B5/B7/ B8
TD-LTE B38/B39/B40/B41(2555-2655MHz)

 

  Judging by those specifications, that phone only has one compatible band/frequency for 2G, band 2 or 1900MHz. On the other hand, that phone has both of the compatible bands/frequencies for '3G'. With regards to LTE, that phone only has one of the compatible bands/frequencies, band 7 or 2600MHz. You can verify the compatible bands/frequencies here.

 

  While the phone should work on the networks, coverage depends on the matching bands/frequencies on your surrounding towers as not all bands/frequencies are used at all tower locations. You can get an idea of the cellular towers in your area here.

 

  The observation you note happens because the frequencies used for LTE are different than those used for UMTS(WCDMA) and GSM ('3G' and 2G, respectively). Except for bands 12 and 17 (700 MHz), the lower frequencies of '3G'/2G have a better penetrative ability and can travel farther than the higher frequencies used for LTE (see graphic here). If you're close to the edge of band 7 coverage, its strength may not be strong enough to penetrate the buildings you enter.

 

  Unfortunately there isn't a workaround, per se. If you have the same issue at a location you're constantly visiting (ie your home or workplace), you might consider purchasing a signal booster for that location.

 

  Hope this helps Smiley

 

Cheers

View solution in context
3 REPLIES 3
Cawtau
Senior MVP

Hello Wzfoto,

 

  Welcome to the community!

 

  These are the network bands for the device from that web page:

 

GSM B2/B3/B8
WCDMA B1/B2/B5/B8
TD-SCDMA B34/B39
CDMA2000/1X BC0
FDD-LTE B1/B3/ B5/B7/ B8
TD-LTE B38/B39/B40/B41(2555-2655MHz)

 

  Judging by those specifications, that phone only has one compatible band/frequency for 2G, band 2 or 1900MHz. On the other hand, that phone has both of the compatible bands/frequencies for '3G'. With regards to LTE, that phone only has one of the compatible bands/frequencies, band 7 or 2600MHz. You can verify the compatible bands/frequencies here.

 

  While the phone should work on the networks, coverage depends on the matching bands/frequencies on your surrounding towers as not all bands/frequencies are used at all tower locations. You can get an idea of the cellular towers in your area here.

 

  The observation you note happens because the frequencies used for LTE are different than those used for UMTS(WCDMA) and GSM ('3G' and 2G, respectively). Except for bands 12 and 17 (700 MHz), the lower frequencies of '3G'/2G have a better penetrative ability and can travel farther than the higher frequencies used for LTE (see graphic here). If you're close to the edge of band 7 coverage, its strength may not be strong enough to penetrate the buildings you enter.

 

  Unfortunately there isn't a workaround, per se. If you have the same issue at a location you're constantly visiting (ie your home or workplace), you might consider purchasing a signal booster for that location.

 

  Hope this helps Smiley

 

Cheers


wzfoto
I'm a Participant Level 2

For furture phone purchase references, which LTE band  exist in all towers? And is there a list of phones that will achieve LTE speed across the nation?


@wzfoto wrote:

For furture phone purchase references, which LTE band  exist in all towers? And is there a list of phones that will achieve LTE speed across the nation?


Hello again,

 

  I don't think there is a LTE band that is available at all towers. However, band 4 or 1700/2100MHz was considered the backbone of the LTE network and would more likely be available at most towers.

 

  With regards to your second question, achieving LTE speeds gets a little more complicated. The speed attainable depends on a number of factors, including location relative to towers, interference between the towers and the device, as well as the band/frequency to which the device connects, to name a few.

 

  The different LTE bands/frequencies have different available bandwidths (see table here). The higher the bandwidth, the greater potential speed. However, if you're benefitting from the increased travel distance of bands 12 or 17, you might have to settle for a slightly slower LTE speed.

 

  So achieving LTE speeds is an interplay of all of the potential factors. In addition, the speeds in dense urban centres might be slower than expected because the bandwidth needs to be shared among a greater number of people.

 

  For the best likelihood of connecting to the LTE network, your device should have all of the compatible LTE bands/frequencies. **edit** In addition, you should also consider the bands/frequencies for '3G' and 2G. The more compatible bands/frequencies the better. For example, the Redmi 3S would not even function for voice calls or text because it does not have any compatible bands/frequencies for any of the networks**

 

  You noted your phone connected to H+. HSPA+ (H+) is considered 4G because the potential speeds achievable are comparable to LTE.

 

Hope this helps Smiley

 

Cheers